Pro Tools
•Register a festival or a film
Submit film to festivals Promote for free or with Promo Packages

FILMFESTIVALS | 24/7 world wide coverage

Welcome !

Enjoy the best of both worlds: Portal for Film & Festival News, exploring the best of the festivals community.  

An adventure exploring, from dreams to reality, the emerging talents in our community.

Launched in 1995, relentlessly connecting films to festivals, reporting and promoting festivals worldwide.

A brand new website will soon be available. Covid-19 is not helping, stay safe meanwhile.

For collaboration, editorial contributions, or publicity, please send us an email here

User login

|FRENCH VERSION|

RSS Feeds 

Martin Scorsese Masterclass in Cannes

 

 

Best Trailers for August 2020

 

 

ÉCU-The European Independent Film Festival


ÉCU - The European Independent Film Festival is dedicated to the discovery and advancement of the very best independent films from around the world. We are a festival who believes in our independent filmmakers and their artistic talents. ÉCU proudly provides a unique platform that brings together diverse audiences who are hungry for something other than major studio productions and original and innovative filmmakers. 

 
The 16th edition of ÉCU - The European Independent Film Festival will take place on 9th-11th April 2021. Now open for submissions!

 

 

 

For more details regarding the festival, please visit our website at www.ecufilmfestival.com

 

 


feed

10 Things You Didn't Know About European Directors

By Greta Lorez

 

Did you know…

… Jean-Luc Godard, one of the founding
members of the Nouvelle Vague, was the son of a Swiss couple. Born in
Paris, he spent his childhood in Switzerland and at the age of 18,
moved back to Paris where he studied Ethnology at the Sorbonne. Godard,
however, never severed his Swiss connection: many of his movies were
shot on location in Switzerland. He lives there now.

… the German filmmaker Wim Wenders (Paris, Texas, Wings of Desire) gave American director Jim Jarmusch (Coffee and Cigarettes) his 16 mm black and white leftovers. Jarmusch included this material in a 30 minute short named Stranger than Paradise which he later, after a producer watched it, turned into the feature film.

 

Scene from “Stranger Than Paradise” (Jarmusch).

… the German auteur filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Ali: Fear Eats the Soul)
stole his own short from the film school where he had applied and was
rejected. Fassbinder was so furious that the school did not return the
film to him that he (so it’s told) broke into the school and stole the
movie back.

… Wim Wenders’ Wings of Desire was shot
without a script. Instead, Wenders improvised the storyline. Once they
started shooting, Wenders realized that a character was missing and
called the actor Peter Falk. Falk’s character? A former angel who
becomes a human. The film won Palm d’Or for Best Director and later,
Hollywood bought the rights of the story for the remake City of Angels.

… Wes Anderson (who mostly lives in
Paris and who shot his last movie in London) allegedly loves drinking
coffee in the hotel lobby such as the Bar de l’Hotel in the 6th
arrondissement in Paris.

… the Danish director Von Triers’ (Dogma, Dancer in the Dark and recently Antichrist
with Charlotte Gainsbourg and William Dafoe) real name is Lars Holbaek
Trier. The “von” in the middle of his name, what indicates an
aristrocratic family he created as a pseudonym.

… the Italian filmmaker Michelangelo
Antonioni ordered his production designers to paint the grass and the
tree leaves for the famous park scene in Blow Up so that they
looked greener. Antonioni even ordered to paint the facades of an
entire street of houses for a single shot because he thought they
weren’t coloured enough. The next day, the houses were painted back to
their original colour.

… Polish filmmaker Krzystof Kieslowski once worked on all the three movies of his famous trilogy Blue, White, Red at the same time. (Wrote Red in the morning, shot White during the day and edited Blue at night.)

… late French filmmaker Eric Rohmers, a
member of the nouvelle vague and the chief editor of “Cahier du cinéma”
real name was Jean-Marie Maurice Schérer. When Rohmer was asked why he
choosed the name “Eric Rohmer” he replied, “There was no reason, it was
just a name I liked.” He signed his first article with the name in 1950
for the magazine.

… it was Francois Truffaut who wrote the script for Godard’s movie A bout de souffle (Breathless). Truffaut wrote it as a short story before he turned it into a script.

… the German/Turkish filmmaker Fatih Akin (Head-On, The Edge of Heaven) wrote the script for his first feature movie Short Sharp Shock
when he was still in school. At 16, Fatih Akin decided to become a
director. He wrote his script in his school books, entered into a
production company in Hamburg and gave them his schoolbooks with his
story. The producers recognized his talent and after two short movies,
Akin shot Short Sharp Shock and began his career.

… Frederico Fellini started his career
by drawing comic strips. Talented at drawing little cartoons as a young
boy, he made them for friends, teachers and family. When Fellini got
older, he worked as cartoonist and journalist at the daily paper “Il
Piccolo”.

 

On the set of “La Strada” (Fellini).

… German filmmaker Tom Tykwer (Run Lola Run, Heaven)
was rejected by all German and French film schools. Tykwer, crazy about
movies, worked as a director of programming at a independant movie
theater in Berlin. There, he met his future Director of Photography
(working there as a film projectionist) and so their work began..

… Jim Jarmusch (who lived in Paris in
his youth and is since, very attached to the city) some times comes to
Paris with his fotocamera or polaroidcamera and wanders around in the
middle of the night taking pictures of cabdrivers, musicians, and
people he coincidentally meets on the streets.

… Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman (The Virgin Spring)
once, after having a dispute over censorship, became so angry about it
that he put several obscene pictures in the front credits of his film
Persona.

 

The not-so angelic Ingmar Bergman.

Comments (1)

How many Rohmers does it take...

'Eric Rohmers, [...] real name was Jean-Marie Maurice Schérer. When Rohmer was asked why he
choosed the name “Eric Rohmer”...'

There is so much wrong with that sentence, where does one begin?

User images

About ÉCU-The European Independent Film Festival

Hillier Scott
(ECU)

 

 

Scott Hillier, Founder and President of ÉCU - The European Independent Film Festival
 
Scott Hillier is a director, cinematographer, and screenwriter, based in Paris, France. In the last 20 years, Hillier has gained international recognition from his strong and incredible cinematography, editing, writing, producing and directing portfolio in both the television and film industries.  
 
Scott began his career in the television industry in Australia. In 1988, he moved to London getting a job with the BBC who then set him to Baghdad. This opportunity led him to 10 years of traveling around world for the BBC, mainly in war zones like Somalia, Bosnia, Tchetcheynia, Kashmir, and Lebanon. After a near fatal encounter with a Russian bomber in Tchechnyia, Hillier gave up his war coverage and began in a new direction. 
 

He moved to New York City in 1998.  He directed and photographed eight one-hour documentaries for National Geographic and The Discovery Channel. Based on his war knowledge and experience, Hillier wrote and directed a short film titled, “Behind the Eyes of War!" The film was awarded “Best Short Dramatic Film” at the New York Independent Film and TV Festival in 1999. From that he served as Supervising Producer and Director for the critically acclaimed CBS 42 part reality series, "The Bravest” in 2002 and wrote and directed a stage play called, "Deadman’s Mai l," which ran at Le Théâtre du Moulin de la Galette in Paris during the summer of 2004. He then became the Director of Photography on a documentary titled, “Twin Towers." This was yet another life changing experience for Hillier. The riveting documentary won an Academy Award for "Best Documentary Short Subject" in 2003. In 2004, Hillier changed continents again, spending three months in Ethiopia. He produced “Worlds Apart,” a pilot for ABC America / True Entertainment / Endemol. As you can see, Hillier was and is always in constant movement and enjoys working in a number of diverse creative areas including documentaries, music videos, commercials, feature and short films.

 
Scott studied film at New York University and The London Film and Television School. He also studied literary non-fiction writing at Columbia University. Hillier's regular clients include the BBC, Microsoft, ABC, PBS and National Geographic. Between filming assignments, he used to teach film, a Masters Degree course in Screenwriting at the Eicar International Film School in Paris, France and journalism at the Formation des Journalistes Français in Paris, France. 
 

 


Paris

France



View my profile
Send me a message
gersbach.net